What were the largest groups of immigrants to the English colonies in the 17th and 18th centuries?

journal article

Migrations to the Thirteen British North American Colonies, 1700-1775: New Estimates

The Journal of Interdisciplinary History

Vol. 22, No. 4 (Spring, 1992)

, pp. 691-709 (19 pages)

Published By: The MIT Press

https://doi.org/10.2307/205241

https://www.jstor.org/stable/205241

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The Journal of Interdisciplinary History features substantive articles, research notes, review essays, and book reviews relating historical research and work in applied fields such as economics and demographics. Spanning all geographical areas and periods of history, topics include: social history demographic history psychohistory political history family history economic history cultural history technological history

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journal article

Immigration to New England, 1680-1740

Journal of Political Economy

Vol. 44, No. 2 (Apr., 1936)

, pp. 225-239 (15 pages)

Published By: The University of Chicago Press

https://www.jstor.org/stable/1829663

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Current issues are now on the Chicago Journals website. Read the latest issue.One of the oldest and most prestigious journals in economics, the Journal of Political Economy (JPE) presents significant and essential scholarship in economic theory and practice. The journal publishes highly selective and widely cited analytical, interpretive, and empirical studies in a number of areas, including monetary theory, fiscal policy, labor economics, development, microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, international trade and finance, industrial organization, and social economics.

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Who was the largest group of immigrants in the 18th century?

Between 1700 and 1740, a large majority of the net overseas migration to these colonies were Africans. In the third quarter of the 18th century, the population of that region amounted to roughly 55% British, 38% black, and 7% German.

Which major groups of immigrants came to the colonies in the 1700's?

The answer may be in some of the major migrations of settlers to the colonies in the 1700s. Two major groups that arrived during that time were the Germans and the Scots-Irish. Detail of Palatine Church, early German immigrants.

What two groups were the largest immigrants in the early mid 1800s?

Famine and political revolution in Europe led millions of Irish and German citizens to immigrate to America in the mid-nineteenth century.

What was the largest group of immigrants?

The United States was home to 22.0 million women, 20.4 million men, and 2.5 million children who were immigrants. The top countries of origin for immigrants were Mexico (24 percent of immigrants), India (6 percent), China (5 percent), the Philippines (4.5 percent), and El Salvador (3 percent).